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for us to talk abo about. we cannot stand by the sidelines in denial untouched, unamended, medicare is going to run out of money in 12 years. that is scary. >> but it's what durbin didn't say that was striking. in his prepared remarks durbin was going to say the following. quote, progressives should be willing to talk about ways to ensure the long-term viability of social security, medicare and medicaid, but those conversations should not be part of a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. durbin never said those remarks. he left that out. he later said he stood by those comments, and he did argue that medicare shouldn't be part of any up front down payment on the debt but part of the next year's long longer term negotiation. now while the short term talk to republicans may be tough, the longer term message to liberals is clear. entitlements in some form or fashion will need to be on the table. that means medicare. and a new "washington post"/abc poll shows just how politically tough making any changes to medicare will be. across party lines respondents said they are opposed to increasing
democrats are facing pressure from interest groups who oppose changes to medicare and social security like this one from the aarp. >> some politicians think medicare and social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future of these programs into a last-minute budget teal, we'll all pay the price. >> and there's your potential pressure from the left. gop negotiators have put adjusting the measure of inflation which determines social security benefits back on the table, something the president had agreed to in 2011. majority leader harry reid has ruled that out this time and the number two democrat durbin repeated reid's position on sunday. >> social security does not add one penny to our debt. not a penny. it's a separate funded operation and we can do things, and i believe we should, now, smaller things, played out over the longer term that gives it solvency. medicare is another story. >> there's still staff level discussions going on. and, by the way, as much as washington gets cau
've meant medicare and medicaid. >> i refer to health care programs and i think the president has long made clear that he is open to discussions about strengthening social security as part of a separate tract. we should address the drivers of the deficit and social security is not currently a driver of the deficit. >> they made that abundant ly clear. when they say entitlement reform it does not include social security and what they define it as. grover norquist is having to defend himself after several prominent senate republicans indicated a willingness to break his famous pledge, arguing republicans who agree to tax hikes just like they did under president bush. >> it is important that the republicans don't have their fingerprints all over the murder weapon, their fingerprints all over a lousy budget deal with tax increases and no real spending, just as happened to republicans in 1990 which cost us the presidency in '92. >> "the wall street journal" defends norquist today writing, quote, the voters are smart enough to know that republicans who focus on mr. norquist are part of the proble
you said in terms of medicare reform and medicaid. obviously republicans are saying, look, in exchange for any type of taxes going up, we want to see some real entitlement reform. you talk about cracking down on waste, fraud and abuse. is there enough revenue from waste, fraud and abuse and m medicare to get the type of serious deficit reform needed to bring down the $16 trillion debt? >> well, you know, i think anytime you're talking about a deficit, there's two ways to bring it down, and i know you know this well. you're either going to raise revenue or have cuts, and i would continue to argue for a balanced approach which means i do think you can find savings in both programs. but what i'm concerned about is what the real agenda is and the real agenda, in my opinion, is to end medicare. i mean, that was certainly a big item in the presidential debate is changing medicare into a voucher program. so what i don't believe in is changing the fundamental structure where we break the guarantee to seniors that we've had in our country for decades. that i disagree with. finding savings, ther
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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